Maps

Places mentioned in the books: a map of Britain during the Regency era, showing many of the real and invented places visited by my heroes and heroines. Not all places featured in the books have been included. Note that the North Sea was at that time known as the German Ocean, and Ireland was all part of Britain.

So what are those invented places?

  • Abbeymount – home of the Earl of Belwarren, grandfather of Ferdy Makenham who fell in love with Fanny Winteron in The Seamstress.
  • Branton – the Lancashire mill town where Johnny Moreton lived in Woodside.
  • Brinshire – the non-existent county which is the setting for much of The Daughters of Allamont Hall.
  • Castle Morton – home to the Duke of Dunmorton, where Gus Marford was sent to look at some horses in Lord Augustus.
  • Charlsby – home of Allan, the Earl of Brackenwood, who fell in love with Annabelle in The Governess.
  • Drummoor – the vast, rambling home of the Marquess of Carrbridge and his Marford brothers, which appears in numerous books, starting with Connie.
  • Glenbrindle Castle – the Scottish home of Lord Kilbraith who romanced Mary in Dulcie, and reappeared in Lord Humphrey. Also mentioned in The Painter.
  • Market Clunbury – the small town harbouring secrets in Dulcie and shops to entice Lucy in The Chaperon. Also features as the nearest town to Great Maeswood in the Strangers series.
  • Sagborough – the growing Yorkshire town where Ferdy Makenham went to live in The Seamstress, and where Nell Caldicott found answers to a mystery in The Widow.
  • Stoneleigh – the large home of Leo Audley, the distractingly handsome hero of The Chaperon.
  • Pendower – the tiny Cornish fishing village where the Brig Minerva was wrecked in The Clerk, thus setting in train all the events of the Silver Linings series.
  • Valmont – the extremely grand home (modelled on Versailles) of the Duke of Falconbury, who drowned on the Brig Minerva in the Silver Linings series, and his brother Lord Randolph Litherholm. Valmont is seen in The Lacemaker and The Duke.